Ep 124 – Breaking Barriers with Adaptive Athlete and Coach Kevin Ogar

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“I think we’ve seen a lot of these to-be athletes, these persons with disabilities be told no, or that they can’t, and then they just give up or they stop and they’ve never actually tried, and they’re only told no because of some statistic that says they’re probably not going to.  But they’ve never tried for themselves, and I’ve always thought that was kind of weird.  And what we’re finding is that when we get these people to try, those statistics are wrong, and they’re based off people who don’t want to do any better.  And so, they have this whole vast life of functionality that they haven’t even begun to tap because someone somewhere along the road said, ‘Hey, don’t do that.’  Or, ‘Hey, you can’t do that.’  Or, ‘You should be careful because you’re already broken.’  I think my big goal is to allow them to understand, yeah, you may have some broken parts and pieces but it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t try to better those things.  You shouldn’t [stop trying] to push and the limits of your athleticism just because someone told you no.  I mean, imagine an able-bodied person, imagine the CrossFit Games if half of these athletes had been told no and they just stopped and hadn’t pushed the limit.” – Kevin Ogar

In the blink of an eye, Kevin Ogar’s life dramatically changed while weightlifting during a fitness competition.  An erratic bounce of a barbell clipped him in the back, injuring his spinal cord and leaving him paralyzed from the waist down.

At just 28, Kevin went from being an active CrossFit coach and aspiring Games competitor to being paraplegic and learning how to navigate life from a wheelchair.  In the aftermath of the accident, Kevin was surrounded by love and support from the CrossFit community, and his passion for CrossFit helped him navigate through some dark times as he focused on getting back in the gym and to the community he loves.

In the years since the accident, Kevin has not only become a prolific adaptive athlete, he has also dedicated himself to helping others use CrossFit for fitness and recovery.  He travels the world teaching CrossFit Level 1 seminars and Adaptive Training Academy courses, runs his own affiliate, CrossFit Watchtower, volunteers with Craig Hospital to run a therapeutic recreation program, and is on the board of directors for The Reveille Project, a non-profit that provides tools to aid veterans as they adapt back to civilian life.

I had the opportunity to catch up with Kevin at the 2019 CrossFit Games, and we chatted about his recovery process, how he adjusts his mindset when he’s having a down day, and his passion for helping others push beyond their limits to achieve more than they ever thought possible.

In this episode we discuss:

  • How Kevin got into fitness, and what it was like to be doing CrossFit while the sport was in it’s infancy
  • His competitive drive and how that helped him succeed as a Regionals athlete
  • The injury that severed Kevin’s spinal cord and resulted in paralysis from the waist down
  • The overwhelming support he received following his injury and his desire to give back to the community
  • The mental, emotional, and physical stages of his recovery
  • Kevin’s partnership with Craig Hospital which helps other rehab patients try CrossFit
  • His own drive to resume CrossFit during his recovery
  • Opening his affiliate, CrossFit WatchTower, and how he keeps the focus of his gym on creating a community for those who need CrossFit to help with recovery
  • Getting started as an adaptive athlete
  • Kevin’s goals for the Adaptive Training Academy (formerly the CrossFit Adaptive Athlete Certificate course)
  • His non-profit, The Reveille Project, and how they’re helping veterans get involved with CrossFit to restore their lives post-active duty
  • His work on the CrossFit Level 1 Seminar Staff
  • Kevin’s process for changing his mindset when he’s having a down day
  • How Kevin hopes to impact people
  • Why it’s so important to continue trying, even if someone tells you no
  • Three things that have the biggest positive impact on Kevin’s health
  • One thing he struggles with that could have a big impact on his health
  • What a healthy life looks like to Kevin

You can follow Kevin on Instagram and Facebook, and you can support The Reveille Project here.

Links:

Related Episodes:

Ep 37 – Steph Hammerman on overcoming obstacles, teaching CrossFit, and crushing cancer
Ep 60 – Chris Spealler on training for longevity and becoming a Master
Ep 75 – Growth through Adversity with Kyle Maynard

If you like this episode, please subscribe to Pursuing Health on iTunes and give it a rating. I’d love to hear your feedback in the comments below and on social media using the hashtag #PursuingHealth. I look forward to bringing you future episodes with inspiring individuals and ideas about health every other Tuesday.

Disclaimer: This podcast is meant to share the experiences of various individuals. It does not provide medical advice, and it is not a substitute for advice from your physician or health care professional.


Ep 123 – Zoë Harcombe on Dissecting Nutrition Research and Dietary Guidelines

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“For me it’s so easy, it’s just so easy.  So, if we could put aside the conflicts, would we all be able to agree that we should eat real food and not processed food?  Surely, that is a starting point that we could all agree on.  And it’s actually where carnivores and vegans should be on the same plate.  So, please guys, can we agree, we know… horribly conflicted in the US, with the dieticians in bed with half the fake food companies in the world, it’s the same in the UK, it’s absolutely the same in Australia although they’re trying to clean it up a bit…  So, that is getting in the way of what should be just such an easy first principle.  Eat. Real. Food.” – Zoë Harcombe

Zoë Harcombe, Ph.D., is a researcher, author, blogger, and speaker in the fields of nutrition and health.  Her particular area of expertise is public health dietary guidelines, especially dietary fat, nutrition and obesity. She has a BA in Economics and an MA in Mathematics from Cambridge University, and she earned her PhD in Public Health Nutrition from the University of the West of Scotland.

Zoë is well known for her thorough examination of nutrition research studies and journal articles, and she advocates for the public to be educated in evidence-based dietary advice.  After many years as a vegetarian, Zoë herself now follows a low carb, high fat diet and believes that eating real food, including animal protein, is the key to long term health.

I had the opportunity to sit down with Zoë at the 2019 CrossFit Health Conference where she was presenting on the corruption plaguing current nutrition advice.  We covered a wide range of topics including what prompted her to leave a successful human resources career to pursue her Ph.D. in public health nutrition, and how, as she completed her thesis, she learned that much of current public health dietary advice is not evidence-based.  We also talked about what she believes research shows to be the best diet, why there is so much misinformation regarding nutrition out there, and what listeners can do to influence change in the current dietary guidelines.

In this episode we discuss:

  • Zoë’s background and how her brother’s diabetes spurred an interest in nutrition
  • Her interest in studying eating disorders while at University of Cambridge
  • What her experience of writing a book was like while working another job
  • Why she decided to leave a successful human resources career and return to school for her Ph.D.
  • The research she pursued as part of her Ph.D.
  • Why Zoë believes the current dietary fat guidelines were released in spite of lack of significant research findings
  • What Zoë thinks the research is telling us about which is the best possible diet to follow
  • The nutrients we need to survive
  • Her take on the fat-carb combo, and how that makes our appetite insatiable
  • Why she was initially vegetarian, how she made the transition to eating meat, and how she reconciled the change with her ethics
  • The changes Zoë noticed when she began eating meat
  • How eating meat benefits the planet by improving topsoil
  • The addictive nature of carbohydrates
  • Vegetables and fiber: how the evidence for 5 a day isn’t as strong as we think
  • The difference in fiber in vegetables versus whole grains
  • Zoë’s process for dissecting research studies
  • How she advises the layperson to analyze articles they are reading, and what red flags they should be looking for
  • Why Zoë believes revising the current dietary guidelines is so important, and what she’s doing to create change
  • What listeners can do to influence change in the current dietary guidelines
  • Three things Zoë does on a regular basis that have the biggest positive impact on her health
  • One thing she struggles to implement that could have a big impact on her health
  • What a healthy life looks like to Zoë

You can follow Zoë on her blog, her YouTube channel, her podcast, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Links:

Related Episodes:

Ep 35 – Coach Greg Glassman on CrossFit, Chronic Disease, and the “5 Buckets of Death”
Ep 71 – The Sugar Free Revolution with Karen Thomson
Ep 80 – Greg Glassman on Networking CrossFit Physicians and Fighting Chronic Disease
Ep 93 – Debunking Nutrition Myths with Gary Taubes
Ep 118 – The State of CrossFit with Coach Greg Glassman

If you like this episode, please subscribe to Pursuing Health on iTunes and give it a rating. I’d love to hear your feedback in the comments below and on social media using the hashtag #PursuingHealth. I look forward to bringing you future episodes with inspiring individuals and ideas about health every other Tuesday.

Disclaimer: This podcast is meant to share the experiences of various individuals. It does not provide medical advice, and it is not a substitute for advice from your physician or health care professional.


Ep 122 – Competing in the CrossFit Games while in Medical School: Singapore’s Fittest Man Ian Wee

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There was, of course, a lot of shock, a lot of happiness, a lot of pride because we all knew that this was the first time that Singapore gets to send athletes to the Games.  Of course, within the box… members were proud, the box owners were very happy.  Outside of the box I received a lot of support from people I don’t know- people overseas via social media, and of course, my family.” – Ian Wee

Ian Wee, the Fittest Man in Singapore, is one of 236 athletes who qualified for the 2019 CrossFit Games by earning a National Champion title in the CrossFit Open.  This feat is all the more impressive when you consider that he’s also in the process of completing medical school, so his time spent training has been quite a bit less than many of his competitors.

A student at the National University of Singapore Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, Ian has been participating in CrossFit off and on since 2013.  Over the past six years, he’s taken time away from the sport to focus on medical training and research (he’s published over 50 papers), and to compete as a National Olympic Weightlifter for Team Singapore, where he’s set national records in the snatch and total.

With the announcement of the changes to the 2019 Games selection process, Ian re-committed himself to regular CrossFit training and found ways to squeeze in extra sessions while keeping up with his studies.  His efforts paid off when he finished the Open in first place for his country, securing a berth to his rookie CrossFit Games.

I had the pleasure of chatting with Ian the 2019 CrossFit Games, and it was fun to compare notes on what it’s like to be a medical student while training as an elite athlete.  We talked about his experience representing his country at the Games, how he balances school with training, and what plans he has in store for the future.

In this episode we discuss:

  • Ian’s athletic background and how he made the transition from working out at home to training at an affiliate
  • His experience competing as a National Olympic Weightlifter for Team Singapore
  • His interest in research and some of the studies he’s published
  • Where Ian is at in medical school and how he fits in his CrossFit Games training
  • The factors that led him to pursue a career in medicine
  • Why he’s considering a career in surgery
  • The process for arranging to take time off to attend the Games
  • The support he received from his family, affiliate, and community as he prepared for the Games
  • His CrossFit Games experience
  • The next event on the horizon for Ian
  • The changes Ian made to his training to prepare for the Games
  • His approach to training for the 2020 season
  • Three things Ian does on a regular basis that have the biggest positive impact on his health
  • One thing he struggles to implement that could have a big impact on his health
  • What a healthy life looks like to Ian

You can follow Ian on Instagram and Facebook.

Links:

Related episodes:

If you like this episode, please subscribe to Pursuing Health on iTunes and give it a rating. I’d love to hear your feedback in the comments below and on social media using the hashtag #PursuingHealth. I look forward to bringing you future episodes with inspiring individuals and ideas about health every other Tuesday.

Disclaimer: This podcast is meant to share the experiences of various individuals. It does not provide medical advice, and it is not a substitute for advice from your physician or health care professional.